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Oman is a heaven in its own

Oman takes great pride in its magnificent ecology and diverse flora and fauna, actively protecting it through the establishment of nature reserves such as the Daymaniyat Islands near Muscat, the turtle reserve at Ras Al Jinz, the Land of Frankincense in Dhofar or the Arabian Oryx Sanctuary in Al Wusta.

OMAN

Enjoy the time in the calm of the wilderness. As you arrive at the camp, you cross a bridge and climb a few giant steps, you are greeted by an endless horizon with a single, flat-topped acacia, the quintessential shape of East Africa. “When I laid out the camp and design, it was using the arrival, the bridge, the main area and one single distant tree as a central line. I tasked the tentmakers with the job of building a 25-metre tent (eh biggest they had ever tried, with an arrival opening that was an exact proportion of the 35mm photographic frame. At National Geographic we often speak of these proportions as “the golden rectangle.” It is based on the Fibonacci formula. I love details like that”. The design and decor pay homage to the essence of East Africa; Swahili heritage is reflected in large wooden doors from the island of Lamu, and accents of red to honour the great Maasai chiefs and warriors. With the rich leathers, copper and brass used in campaign-style furniture, you have a lavish yet comfortable atmosphere that complements, rather than overwhelms the surrounding wilderness. This camp speaks to the intersection of cultures and as a meeting place to talk, share ideas and to share experiences, like the ones you will have here each day.

Best of Oman

Oman takes great pride in its magnificent ecology and diverse flora and fauna, actively protecting it through the establishment of nature reserves such as the Daymaniyat Islands near Muscat, the turtle reserve at Ras Al Jinz, the Land of Frankincense in Dhofar or the Arabian Oryx Sanctuary in Al Wusta.

OMAN

Enjoy the time in the calm of the wilderness

As you arrive at the camp, you cross a bridge and climb a few giant steps, you are greeted by an endless horizon with a single, flat-topped acacia, the quintessential shape of East Africa. “When I laid out the camp and design, it was using the arrival, the bridge, the main area and one single distant tree as a central line. I tasked the tentmakers with the job of building a 25-metre tent (eh biggest they had ever tried, with an arrival opening that was an exact proportion of the 35mm photographic frame. At National Geographic we often speak of these proportions as “the golden rectangle.” It is based on the Fibonacci formula. I love details like that”

The design and decor pay homage to the essence of East Africa; Swahili heritage is reflected in large wooden doors from the island of Lamu, and accents of red to honour the great Maasai chiefs and warriors. With the rich leathers, copper and brass used in campaign-style furniture, you have a lavish yet comfortable atmosphere that complements, rather than overwhelms the surrounding wilderness. This camp speaks to the intersection of cultures and as a meeting place to talk, share ideas and to share experiences, like the ones you will have here each day.